Posts Tagged ‘Kentucky Humanities

23
Oct
09

Images of life: Campbellsville University project catalogs nearly 100,000 images of Taylor County

Country comedian Minnie Pearl mingles with the crowd during homecoming at Campbellsville College in November 1984. Photo courtesy of Central Kentucky News-Journal, Campbellsville University

Country comedian Minnie Pearl mingles with the crowd during homecoming at Campbellsville College in November 1984. Photo courtesy of Central Kentucky News-Journal, Campbellsville University

By Stan McKinney

Crammed into a dozen or so bright yellow boxes, each of which originally contained 500 sheets of 8-by-10-inch photographic paper, are images of life that span two decades in Campbellsville, Ky.

The boxes are stacked in a large metal cabinet and a wooden overhead cupboard. Inside them are dozens of legal size envelopes. And inside each of those are varying numbers of glassine envelopes containing strips of 35mm negatives.

I took all of these photographs between January 1980 and July 2000 when I was the news editor of the Central Kentucky News-Journal. It’s difficult to know exactly how many images are contained within those boxes. Based on the number of rolls of film I usually shot each week, I estimate there are at least 100,000.

The glassine envelopes are acid free. They have provided some protection for the delicate emulsions from time, heat and humidity. The oldest negatives, however, are already showing signs of deterioration.

That’s what concerns me. It is literally a race against time to preserve these images.
Continue reading ‘Images of life: Campbellsville University project catalogs nearly 100,000 images of Taylor County’

23
Oct
09

Being Daniel Boone

By Julie Nelson Harris

There’s no question Scott New is serious about portraying Daniel Boone.

Just walk into the Kentucky County, Va., surveyor’s office at Fort Boonesborough and ask to buy a piece of land.

Especially if you’re a female.

Scott New portrays Daniel Boone for Kentucky Chautauqua. Photo by Alan Meadows

Scott New portrays Daniel Boone for Kentucky Chautauqua. Photo by Alan Meadows

In Daniel Boone’s most gentle, yet direct voice, New reminds the women who enter his cabin to make this transaction alone that in the 1700s, they could not purchase property. Not without their husbands.

“And not one of them has taken offense to it,” said Bill Farmer, living historian at Fort Boonesborough State Historic Site. After all, that’s the way it was in the 18th century — women were not afforded the right to own property. Farmer smiles as he talks about Scott New’s extraordinary effort to make Fort Boonesborough’s visitors feel like they’re living in the year 1775. When Scott began working as a character interpreter at Fort Boonesborough and the Kentucky State Parks system in April, he initiated the surveyor experience: Walk in, buy a piece of property, receive a signed deed from Daniel Boone, and all the while, feel like you’re in the presence of the man himself, learning about the man he really was.
Continue reading ‘Being Daniel Boone’

23
Oct
09

Meet the poet laureate: An interview with Gurney Norman

Gurney Norman was a “mountain kid.”

Born in Grundy, Va., in 1937 and raised in western Virginia and eastern Kentucky, Kentucky’s poet laureate has a unique understanding of the Appalachian region, an understanding that has helped him give back to that area again and again through his labor of love — writing.

Kentucky Poet Laureate Gurney Norman

Kentucky Poet Laureate Gurney Norman

He has produced a number of works focusing on the Appalachian region. His novel Divine Right’s Trip follows a young man who travels from California back to his native Kentucky. Kinfolks is a collection of short stories about a Kentucky mountain family. He has co-edited two anthologies, Confronting Appalachian Stereotypes: Back Talk from an American Region and An American Vein: Critical Readings in Appalachian Literature. He has written and narrated three documentary films about eastern Kentucky’s rivers and trails for KET: “Time on the River,” “From This Valley” and “Wilderness Road.” He is co-author of three screenplays based on stories from the Kinfolks collection: “Fat Monroe,” “Nightride,” and “Maxine.” His forthcoming novella, Ancient Creek, is a contemporary Appalachian folktale.

A graduate of Stuart Robinson School in Letcher County, Norman majored in journalism and English at the University of Kentucky and studied writing at Stanford University as a Stegner Creative Writing Fellow. Thirty years later, he is leading UK’s Creative Writing Program. He serves as advisor to schools and community-based arts groups in Kentucky and the Appalachian region.

Learn more about the 2009-10 poet laureate, who is also a member of the Kentucky Humanities Council’s Speakers Bureau, in his interview with KH.
Continue reading ‘Meet the poet laureate: An interview with Gurney Norman’

23
Oct
09

Yes, they too were Kentuckians: Floyd Collins, cave explorer

By James C. Claypool

The death of Floyd Collins (1887-1925) is said to have constituted one of America’s most sensational media events of the 1920s.

Floyd Collins lived in western Kentucky’s cave region his entire life. He began exploring the extensive cave system in this region as a young man, and in 1925, the year of his tragic death, Collins was considered the foremost authority on the caves and cave systems of western Kentucky. In fact, some have gone so far as to label Collins “the greatest cave explorer ever known.” In 1917, Collins discovered Crystal Cave, which was located at the edge of the vast Mammoth Cave system, a discovery the Collins family tried to turn into a commercial enterprise. However, attendance at Crystal Cave was disappointingly low. In the hope that he might be able to uncover a new entrance to the area’s cave systems and thereby generate a new spark of interest in Crystal Cave, Floyd entered a nearby sandstone cave on Jan. 30, 1925. While crawling through a narrow crawlway that ran 55 feet below the surface, Collins became trapped and would remain so for 13 highly melodramatic days until he died from starvation and exposure.
Continue reading ‘Yes, they too were Kentuckians: Floyd Collins, cave explorer’

06
Oct
09

KHC seeks new magazine editor, public relations director

The Kentucky Humanities Council Inc. in Lexington, a private nonprofit organization affiliated with the National Endowment for the Humanities, is seeking someone for the position of assistant director for marketing and public relations and editor of Kentucky Humanities magazine.

Applicants should have editing and writing experience, academic training, and/or general interest in Kentucky history and culture, and public relations/ marketing skills.

Continue reading ‘KHC seeks new magazine editor, public relations director’

02
Oct
09

Kentucky Humanities October issue hot off the presses

In just a few days, the October issue of Kentucky Humanities magazine will arrive in your mailbox. Not on our mailing list? Fix that now by e-mailing your address to Editor Julie Nelson Harris at julie.harris@uky.edu. If you love Kentucky and appreciate its history, culture and heritage, you want to get this biannual publication.

October 2009 KH coverWhat will you find in this issue?

• Information about the 275th birthday celebration of Daniel Boone at Fort Boonesborough State Historic Site, plus an in-depth look at the work of Kentucky Chautauqua’s Daniel Boone, portrayed by Scott New. Also learn about the man responsible for the majority of Boone research, Lyman Draper.

• An excerpt from Kentucky author Charles Bracelen Flood’s latest book, 1864: Lincoln at the Gates of History. This chapter focuses on the events of Election Night, 1864, and is a fascinating read about this crucial time in Lincoln’s political career.

• Meet Lynn Horine, a Kentucky artist who began making pine needle gourd baskets after suffering from a degenerative disc disease.

• Read about two Kentucky universities — Campbellsville University and Northern Kentucky University — that are working to preserve history by cataloging it for the public to view.

Check the Kentucky Humanities Council Web site to download a PDF of the magazine, and join our mailing list today if you’re not already there!

18
Sep
09

Several University Press authors featured in Speakers Bureau

LEXINGTON (University of Kentucky News) − The Kentucky Humanities Council has released a list of scholars and writers who will serve on its Speakers Bureau for 2009. Among this year’s roster of featured speakers are five faculty and staff members from the University of Kentucky and 10 University Press of Kentucky authors, four of whom are new to the program this year.

The Kentucky Humanities Council Speakers Bureau brings together historians, scholars, writers and poets from across Kentucky. These speakers are available to speak to community groups with an audience of 25 or more about a variety of topics, from World War II to Abraham Lincoln, from how to become a fiction writer to tales of memorable Kentuckians in history. Programs are available at a reduced cost for nonprofit organizations.
Continue reading ‘Several University Press authors featured in Speakers Bureau’