Archive for the 'Kentucky Chautauqua' Category

23
Oct
09

Being Daniel Boone

By Julie Nelson Harris

There’s no question Scott New is serious about portraying Daniel Boone.

Just walk into the Kentucky County, Va., surveyor’s office at Fort Boonesborough and ask to buy a piece of land.

Especially if you’re a female.

Scott New portrays Daniel Boone for Kentucky Chautauqua. Photo by Alan Meadows

Scott New portrays Daniel Boone for Kentucky Chautauqua. Photo by Alan Meadows

In Daniel Boone’s most gentle, yet direct voice, New reminds the women who enter his cabin to make this transaction alone that in the 1700s, they could not purchase property. Not without their husbands.

“And not one of them has taken offense to it,” said Bill Farmer, living historian at Fort Boonesborough State Historic Site. After all, that’s the way it was in the 18th century — women were not afforded the right to own property. Farmer smiles as he talks about Scott New’s extraordinary effort to make Fort Boonesborough’s visitors feel like they’re living in the year 1775. When Scott began working as a character interpreter at Fort Boonesborough and the Kentucky State Parks system in April, he initiated the surveyor experience: Walk in, buy a piece of property, receive a signed deed from Daniel Boone, and all the while, feel like you’re in the presence of the man himself, learning about the man he really was.
Continue reading ‘Being Daniel Boone’

02
Sep
09

He, too, was a Kentuckian: See him in Munfordville

The Hart County Historical Society, together with Kentucky Chautauqua, presents Abraham Lincoln: “I, too, am a Kentuckian” Chautauqua at 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 12 at the historical

Abraham Lincoln portrayed by Jim Sayre

Abraham Lincoln portrayed by Jim Sayre

society museum, 109 Main St. in Munfordville.

Born on a farm in what is now LaRue County, Ky., Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) spent his early years in the Commonwealth. When he was 7, his family moved to Indiana, and later Illinois. But as his native brilliance and burning political ambition carried him to the presidency and

greatness — a panel of historians recently chose him as the most influential American who ever lived — Lincoln always had connections with his native state.

In his law office in Springfield, Ill., he had a partner, William “Billy” Herndon, who hailed from Greensburg, Ky. His best friend in Springfield was Joshua Speed from Louisville. His wife, Mary, was from Lexington, a daughter of the prominent Todd family. And his political role model, a friend of the Todd family, was the Kentucky statesman Henry Clay. During the Civil War, Lincoln was unpopular in Kentucky, but when he said, “I, too, am a Kentuckian,” no one could dispute it.

Continue reading ‘He, too, was a Kentuckian: See him in Munfordville’

02
Sep
09

Atta kul kulla to perform near Ashland

Atta kul kulla (c. 1715–1780) was the peace chief of the powerful Cherokee Nation from 1758 until his death. Called the “most important Indian of his day,” Atta kul kulla was a skilled and sophisticated diplomat. His policies and actions are still controversial, but he did unite his people and lay the foundation for the long-term survival of the Cherokee Nation on a continent where European immigrants were rapidly growing in number.

Atta kul kulla, Cherokee peace chief, portrayed by Robert K. Rambo

Atta kul kulla, Cherokee peace chief, portrayed by Robert K. Rambo

Learn more about this influential Cherokee peace chief as Wolfpen Woods Pioneer Village and Kentucky Chautauqua present Atta kul kulla: Cherokee Peace Chief at 6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 11. Wolfpen Woods is located at 20740 Bolts Fork Road in Rush, Ky., near Ashland.

In 1775, Atta kul kulla played a key role in the famous land transaction known as the Transylvania Purchase. The Cherokees were defeated after a war with the Chickasaw. In return for much-needed arms and ammunition, he made the Treaty of Sycamore Shoals with the Transylvania Land Company, headed by Judge Richard Henderson of North Carolina, who used the agreement to claim purchase of what is now Kentucky. Unlike Henderson, Atta kul kulla did not regard the treaty as a sale. The governments of Great Britain, North Carolina and Virginia termed it illegal and annulled the treaty, but Virginia still used it to claim state ownership. Kentucky was lost to the Cherokee forever and sold to a flood of settlers from the east.

Atta kul kulla died around 1780, but the unity and sense of identity he had forged allowed the Cherokee to prosper until the 1830s, when the U.S. government forcibly removed them to the west from their homelands in the southeast. Atta kul kulla’s legacy is that Cherokees still seek and cherish the separate identity he did so much to establish.

Robert K. Rambo portrays Atta kul kulla for Kentucky Chautauqua. Rambo, who is of Cherokee ancestry, has been studying and portraying the great chief for more than a decade. A graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, Rambo is a graduate student in history at Western Carolina University.

23
Jun
09

New catalog on its way

If you’re on our mailing list, you’re just a few days away from receiving the 2009-2010 Whole Humanities Catalog in your mailbox. And what a loaded catalog it is!

CoverThe publication features all of the players in the upcoming season of Kentucky Chautauqua and the Kentucky Humanities Council Speakers Bureau. We are introducing five new Chautauqua characters — Lucy Bakewell Audubon, wife of ornithologist John James Audubon; Rosemary Clooney, the famed actress and singer from northern Kentucky; Johnny Green, Confederate soldier in the Orphan Brigade; U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan; and Billy Herndon, Abraham Lincoln’s friend and law partner for 18 years. Our Speakers Bureau includes 13 new speakers and a variety of interesting talks. Kentucky Poet Laureate Gurney Norman joins our ranks, in addition to a number of Kentucky writers and scholars.

If you’re not on our mailing list but would like a copy of the magazine, call us at (859) 257-5932, or e-mail julie.harris@uky.edu or kathleen.pool@uky.edu. We’ll get you set up and a catalog on its way!

If you’re an educator, check out information in the catalog about our Chautauqua in the Schools program. Our Chautauqua programs are an excellent addition to your curriculum and are available to Kentucky classrooms at a reduced cost, thanks to National Endowment for the Humanities We The People funding. Click here or call (859) 257-5932 for more information.

Take a sneak peek at the catalog on our Web site. And watch your mailbox — bookings for Kentucky Chautauqua and the Speakers Bureau begin July 1!

05
Jun
09

Dress rehearsal’s over; it’s time for the show

The five new characters in this year’s Kentucky Chautauqua cast made it through their final review this week — and they’re almost ready to take their shows on the road.

On Monday, the characters — Lucy Audubon (Kelly Brengelman), Rosemary Clooney (Bet Stewart), Johnny Green (Ethan Smith), Justice John Marshall Harlan (Ed Smith) and Billy Herndon (Robert Brock) — gave their full 45-minute performances to a crowd of professional and volunteer reviewers. They will use reviewers’ suggestions to fine tune their performances before bookings begin July 1.

Click here to read Herald-Leader arts and entertainment writer Rich Copley’s blog entry about the review and to see a photo slideshow.

The Kentucky Humanities Council’s Whole Humanities Catalog, which advertises all of our Chautauqua performers and Speakers Bureau members, will be available July 1, and bookings for the upcoming season can be made at that time. The catalog is your tool for choosing and booking a Chautauqua performance or Speakers Bureau talk. You can also visit our Web site for instructions.

12
May
09

Kentucky Chautauqua final review set for June 1

The public will soon have the opportunity to preview the Kentucky Humanities Council’s newest slate of Chautauqua performances.

A full dress rehearsal and review for five presenters who will join the Kentucky Chautauqua cast for the 2009-2010 season is scheduled for 9 a.m. June 1 at the Lexington History Museum, 215 W. Main St., Lexington. Each performance will last about 45 minutes, and will be followed by a question-and-answer session with immediate feedback from the council’s team of professional and volunteer reviewers.

The incoming cast includes Lucy Bakewell Audubon, portrayed by Kelly Brengleman of Midway; Rosemary Clooney, portrayed by Bet Stewart of Cincinnati; Johnny Green of the Orphan Brigade, portrayed by Ethan Smith of Cynthiana; Justice John Marshall Harlan, portrayed by Ed Smith of Cynthiana; and Billy Herndon, portrayed by Robert Brock of Horse Cave.
Continue reading ‘Kentucky Chautauqua final review set for June 1’

05
May
09

KHC programs near you

We have several programs scheduled across the state this week, and even out of state. Check out the calendar to see if there’s one near you and plan to attend! You can also visit the KHC calendar online here. Also, don’t forget — the Between Fences Smithsonian exhibit is on display at the Oldham County History Center in La Grange until June 6.

May 5: Daniel Boone: Pathfinder Chautauqua, 11 a.m., Brown Hotel, Louisville.
May 7: Prime Time Family Reading Time, 6 p.m., Boone County Public Library, Union.
May 7: Prime Time Family Reading Time, 5:30 p.m., Boyd County Public Library, Ashland.
May 7: Emilie Todd Helm: Rebel in the White House Chautauqua, 6:30 p.m., Martin County Historical Society, Inez.
May 7: Speaker Diane P. Coon, topic not listed in Whole Humanities Catalog, 7 p.m., Muhlenberg County Public Library, Muhlenberg.
May 9: Emilie Todd Helm: Rebel in the White House Chautauqua, 1 p.m., Bibb House Museum, Russellville.
May 9: Atta kul kulla: Cherokee Peace Chief Chautauqua, 3 p.m., Wilderness Road State Park, Ewing, Va.