Archive for the 'Humanities' Category

30
Nov
09

Kentucky Humanities Council awards $1,200 to Portland Museum for panel discussion

The Kentucky Humanities Council recently awarded $1,200 to Louisville’s Portland Museum for an upcoming forum that focuses on Abraham Lincoln’s presidency and how it was influenced by the media.

The panel discussion, scheduled for 2 p.m. Jan. 17 at the museum, corresponds with an exhibit featuring about 50 engravings that depict the major events of the Lincoln presidency, from the Republican Convention in Chicago in 1860 to the hanging of Lincoln’s assassins in 1865. The images, original engravings published in Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper and Harper’s Weekly, are from a private collection and have not been previously displayed in Kentucky. They tell the story of the Lincoln presidency and demonstrate the power of imagery in the 19th century popular media.

As part of the Lincoln Bicentennial, the Kentucky premiere of this private collection will stimulate discussion on the role of the media in creating mythic and iconic stature of Lincoln in the national culture. Panelists include Dr. John Kleber, professor emeritus of history from Morehead State University, McConnell Center Fellow and editor of several major works, including The Encyclopedia of Louisville and The Encyclopedia of Kentucky; Dr. Thomas Mackey, professor of history at the University of Louisville and adjunct professor of law at the Brandeis School of Law; Richard C. Cooper, manager of interpretive services at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati and Harpers’ Weekly scholar; Stephen George, editor of LEO, a weekly newsprint publication serving the Louisville Metro area; and John Faulkner, director of community relations for the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville.

Since its creation in 1972, the Kentucky Humanities Council, with the assistance of the National Endowment for the Humanities and private contributions, has supported public programs in the humanities throughout the Commonwealth. These programs include, but are not limited to, conferences, lectures, radio and television productions, exhibits, teacher training and development of curricular materials, interpretive programs for festivals, book discussions, and planning for future projects.

For information about this event or Portland Museum, located at 2308 Portland Ave., Louisville, Ky., click here. For more information about applying for a minigrant through the Kentucky Humanities Council, visit our grant introduction page. For information about KHC’s programs and services, click here.

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02
Oct
09

Kentucky Humanities October issue hot off the presses

In just a few days, the October issue of Kentucky Humanities magazine will arrive in your mailbox. Not on our mailing list? Fix that now by e-mailing your address to Editor Julie Nelson Harris at julie.harris@uky.edu. If you love Kentucky and appreciate its history, culture and heritage, you want to get this biannual publication.

October 2009 KH coverWhat will you find in this issue?

• Information about the 275th birthday celebration of Daniel Boone at Fort Boonesborough State Historic Site, plus an in-depth look at the work of Kentucky Chautauqua’s Daniel Boone, portrayed by Scott New. Also learn about the man responsible for the majority of Boone research, Lyman Draper.

• An excerpt from Kentucky author Charles Bracelen Flood’s latest book, 1864: Lincoln at the Gates of History. This chapter focuses on the events of Election Night, 1864, and is a fascinating read about this crucial time in Lincoln’s political career.

• Meet Lynn Horine, a Kentucky artist who began making pine needle gourd baskets after suffering from a degenerative disc disease.

• Read about two Kentucky universities — Campbellsville University and Northern Kentucky University — that are working to preserve history by cataloging it for the public to view.

Check the Kentucky Humanities Council Web site to download a PDF of the magazine, and join our mailing list today if you’re not already there!

01
Oct
09

Our Lincoln DVD on sale now!

If you weren’t able to travel to Washington, D.C., to see Our Lincoln at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, never fear. We’re bringing the experience to you.

DVD coverThe Kentucky Humanities Council, in partnership with Michael Breeding MEDIA, has produced a DVD of the musical, historical and theatrical performance that thrilled its audience in the nation’s capital on Feb. 2. Nearly 1,500 people from six states and D.C. purchased tickets to see this celebration of the life of Kentucky’s most beloved president, Abraham Lincoln. Our Lincoln featured more than 350 performers, many of them Kentuckians — including Metropolitan Opera stars Angela Brown and Gregory Turay, violinist Mark O’Connor, the University of Kentucky Opera Theatre, UK Symphony Orchestra, the Lexington Singers and their Children’s Choir, Kentucky Chautauqua performers and the American Spiritual Ensemble. Public radio broadcaster Bob Edwards was master of ceremonies, and Nick Clooney was a narrator for the performance.

The DVD is $21.20 plus shipping and handling (price includes tax). Order your copy today by visiting the Kentucky Humanities Council’s Web site and filling out the order form.

02
Sep
09

Speakers in central, western Kentucky this weekend

The Kentucky Humanities Council Speakers Bureau will feature talks in central and western Kentucky this weekend by two very interesting presenters — state historian James Klotter and Kentucky NPR commentator Georgia Green Stamper.

In Winchester, Klotter will offer his presentation “A Power Trio: Henry Clay, Mary Todd and Honest Abe,” in which he explores the unique relationship between these three influential Kentuckians. Klotter’s talk begins at 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 3, at the Clark County Public Library, 370 S. Burns Ave, Winchester.

In Greenville, Stamper will tell you about “Extraordinary Ordinary Kentuckians.” A seventh-generation Kentuckian, Stamper is in love with Kentuckians and their unique stories. From farmers in bathrobes who taught her the true meaning of the Christmas story, to a shell-shocked housepainter who took her to Hell on a train, Stamper’s real-life characters will stir the hearts of those in the audience. Her talk begins at 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 3, at the Muhlenberg County Library History Annex, 117 S. Main St., Greenville.

02
Sep
09

He, too, was a Kentuckian: See him in Munfordville

The Hart County Historical Society, together with Kentucky Chautauqua, presents Abraham Lincoln: “I, too, am a Kentuckian” Chautauqua at 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 12 at the historical

Abraham Lincoln portrayed by Jim Sayre

Abraham Lincoln portrayed by Jim Sayre

society museum, 109 Main St. in Munfordville.

Born on a farm in what is now LaRue County, Ky., Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) spent his early years in the Commonwealth. When he was 7, his family moved to Indiana, and later Illinois. But as his native brilliance and burning political ambition carried him to the presidency and

greatness — a panel of historians recently chose him as the most influential American who ever lived — Lincoln always had connections with his native state.

In his law office in Springfield, Ill., he had a partner, William “Billy” Herndon, who hailed from Greensburg, Ky. His best friend in Springfield was Joshua Speed from Louisville. His wife, Mary, was from Lexington, a daughter of the prominent Todd family. And his political role model, a friend of the Todd family, was the Kentucky statesman Henry Clay. During the Civil War, Lincoln was unpopular in Kentucky, but when he said, “I, too, am a Kentuckian,” no one could dispute it.

Continue reading ‘He, too, was a Kentuckian: See him in Munfordville’

02
Sep
09

Atta kul kulla to perform near Ashland

Atta kul kulla (c. 1715–1780) was the peace chief of the powerful Cherokee Nation from 1758 until his death. Called the “most important Indian of his day,” Atta kul kulla was a skilled and sophisticated diplomat. His policies and actions are still controversial, but he did unite his people and lay the foundation for the long-term survival of the Cherokee Nation on a continent where European immigrants were rapidly growing in number.

Atta kul kulla, Cherokee peace chief, portrayed by Robert K. Rambo

Atta kul kulla, Cherokee peace chief, portrayed by Robert K. Rambo

Learn more about this influential Cherokee peace chief as Wolfpen Woods Pioneer Village and Kentucky Chautauqua present Atta kul kulla: Cherokee Peace Chief at 6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 11. Wolfpen Woods is located at 20740 Bolts Fork Road in Rush, Ky., near Ashland.

In 1775, Atta kul kulla played a key role in the famous land transaction known as the Transylvania Purchase. The Cherokees were defeated after a war with the Chickasaw. In return for much-needed arms and ammunition, he made the Treaty of Sycamore Shoals with the Transylvania Land Company, headed by Judge Richard Henderson of North Carolina, who used the agreement to claim purchase of what is now Kentucky. Unlike Henderson, Atta kul kulla did not regard the treaty as a sale. The governments of Great Britain, North Carolina and Virginia termed it illegal and annulled the treaty, but Virginia still used it to claim state ownership. Kentucky was lost to the Cherokee forever and sold to a flood of settlers from the east.

Atta kul kulla died around 1780, but the unity and sense of identity he had forged allowed the Cherokee to prosper until the 1830s, when the U.S. government forcibly removed them to the west from their homelands in the southeast. Atta kul kulla’s legacy is that Cherokees still seek and cherish the separate identity he did so much to establish.

Robert K. Rambo portrays Atta kul kulla for Kentucky Chautauqua. Rambo, who is of Cherokee ancestry, has been studying and portraying the great chief for more than a decade. A graduate of the Virginia Military Institute, Rambo is a graduate student in history at Western Carolina University.

16
Jul
09

Kentucky Humanities Council awards $7,800 in grant funding

The Kentucky Humanities Council recently awarded a total of $7,800 to two Kentucky organizations for public programming.

The Lexington Opera Society will receive $6,600 to take its historical children’s opera, “A Shirt-Tailed Boy Named Abe,” to between 40 and 60 elementary schools across the state. The production focuses on the early years of Abraham Lincoln’s life, when he lived in Kentucky. Through spirited dialogue and song, history unfolds as four friends discuss, argue and act out various moments in Lincoln’s early life — moments that developed the well-known character traits that influenced Lincoln’s behavior while he served as a lawyer, a U.S. Senator and the 16th president of the United States. The Lexington Opera Society has produced a teacher’s guide to complement the opera.
Continue reading ‘Kentucky Humanities Council awards $7,800 in grant funding’